Courtesy Titles and Names

See CMS 8.7–8.17 for guidance on how to treat names from specific countries.

When using a courtesy title to refer to a woman and a man, use “Ms.” and “Mr.,” respectively, unless “Professor” or “Dr.” is appropriate. In speaker or author biographies and letters to the editor, use the courtesy title on second reference to an author. “Professor” should be used only if the speaker or author is currently teaching at the college level. Use “Dr.” if the person has a PhD but is not teaching.

Example: Katrina Sherrerd, CFA, received her PhD from the Darden School at the University of Virginia; Dr. Sherrerd began her career . . . ; David Anthony manages the Country Risk Service. Mr. Anthony previously served as . . .

In all other circumstances, use the last name only on second reference.

Example: Milton Friedman’s analysis of . . . ; Friedman then went on to explain . . .

Margaret Thatcher’s tenure as prime minister . . . ; Thatcher’s economic policy . . .

Always use “chair” as the title for those who chair CFA Institute boards or committees.

Example: CFA Institute Board of Governors Chair Aaron Low, CFA; Aaron Low, CFA, chair of the Board of Governors…

When a person has an endowed (named) chair, use initial caps for the whole title (without “the”).

Example: Robert Brooks, CFA, is the Wallace D. Malone, Jr., Endowed Chair of Financial Management at the University of Alabama.